The Broad
The Broad

The Broad

The Broad is a gallery that can be found just next to the Walt Disney Concert Hall which opened not too long ago in 2015. It’s strange because it already looks quite dated and visually isn’t very pleasing at all, in fact it’s even been likened to a cheese grater, which I’d say is a very fair and accurate comment to be honest. The design may not be to everyone’s tastes when it comes to visual appearance but it more than makes up for it when it comes to functionality. The building was conceptually designed by Renfro and Diller Scofidio, the building is covered in a white honeycomb veil, this cover lets light into the gallery whilst protecting the exhibits from direct sunlight. So, though it may not look so appealing its design is actually quite fantastic.

The Cinerama Dome
The Cinerama Dome

The Cinerama Dome

Nothing says 1950s/60s USA like any word with ‘rama’ tagged on the end of it. And another one of LA’s iconic cinemas does just that, the Cinerama Dome on the famous Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood is no doubt a sight that you will recognise. Initially the building was created as a prototype, with the intention of building many more dome shaped cinemas all across the country. It was based on a design made by R. Buckminster Fuller though for one reason or another no more were made. It was built in 1963 with a curved screen that measured at 86 feet wide and seated 100 people. Since 2002 the Cinerama Dome has been one of only three cinemas in the entire world to use a three-camera system and it’s still used for film premieres to this day, though not all of them can take advantage of the full screen.

The Theme Building
The Theme Building

The Theme Building

If you’re flying into LA and landing at the incredibly famous LAX, then you’ll no doubt spot the Theme Building as you land. This weird and wonderful structure looks like something from War of the Worlds, which may not come as a surprise when you find out that it was built in 1961. That’s because this was the height of America’s love of all things space age, movies included. It used to home the aptly names Encounter Restaurant, however this has since close and is waiting for another tenant to take the reins. You can still visit the building observation deck on top, though it’s only open on weekends for now.

The Capitol Records Building
The Capitol Records Building

The Capitol Records Building

Designed by architect Welton Becket, The Capitol Records Building is one of the most recognisable structures in LA. It was built in 1956 and was designed to look just like a stack vinyl 45 records (this one I can see). Here’s a fun fact, the blinking light on the top of the tower is actually Morse code and spells out the word “Hollywood” at night. If you decide to visit at Christmas time, you’ll also see the top of it adorned with tree shaped lights. You can’t really go on, but the outside is iconic enough for your selfie.